Category: News

India ‘poorly positioned’ to handle growing solar waste

India is unprepared for expected rapid growth in solar PV waste due to a lack of policy framework and guidelines for waste management, according to a new report by consultancy firm Bridge to India.

The ‘Managing India’s PV Module Waste’ report estimates that PV waste volumes will increase to 1.8 million tonnes by 2050, with the country having scaled up installations at breakneck speed from 3GW in 2014 to 28GW in 2018.

Bridge to India has advised that proactive measures are needed, with government and private sector players working together to mitigate the potentially hazardous impacts of such waste on the environment and human health and to maintain sustainable growth in the sector. The country is also said to be lacking the awareness and operational infrastructure required for recycling PV modules.

By comparing international case studies with India’s own e-waste policy, the consultancy has generated a number of recommendations in the report which can be accessed here.

Ultimately, Bridge to India has called for “immediate efforts” to formulate a robust regulatory framework for allocating responsibility and specifying standards for PV waste management.

India’s short-term hurdles won’t stop four-fold PV boom in a decade

Policy headwinds in India will not divert the PV sector from a decade-long path of colossal growth backed by the government, according to Fitch Solutions.

The firm’s latest update predicts Indian PV capacity to ramp up by an average, annual 15.3% between 2018 and 2028, jumping from 26GW to 105.9GW in the period.

The government, Fitch Solutions said, will keep up the momentum through a recipe of “aggressive” growth targets, numerous tenders and policies to unlock investment towards solar.

Thailand, Vietnam imports to sidestep tariffs for China

According to the firm, India’s adoption last year of 25% tariffs for Chinese and Malaysian cells and modules will create uncertainties and costs but these will lessen in the long term.

The duties, Fitch Solutions argued, will likely be scrapped after their two-year expiry date, if it emerges they didn’t succeed in kickstarting a local manufacturing scene able to compete with Chinese imports.

In the interim, the firm continued, plummeting technology costs mean developers can resort to alternative import routes; Thailand and Vietnam, which Chinese manufacturers are expanding to, are already being tapped into.

According to Fitch Solutions, the lack of clarity around the goods and services tax – thought to up PV costs by 5.8% since its roll-out in 2017 – looks set to dispel. Last December’s government clarifications pave the way for developers to negotiate tax reliefs for existing PPAs.

PV’s wish list as India heads to the polls

The Indian PV predictions herald a brighter outlook after a tough 2018, when execution challenges and policy uncertainty sparked a 27.8% drop in installations.

The government – currently in the midst of six-week general elections – has been urged by consultants to “work hard” to restore investor confidence after last year’s “hammering”.

The prediction of Fitch Solutions is that even if prime minister Narendra Modi is not re-elected – in its view, such a scenario is not likely – his successors would respect existing policies to promote renewables.

As the firm noted, the reform set in motion in recent years includes 12GW in installations through the Central Public Sector Undertaking programme, the adoption of renewable power obligations and grid upgrades; Tamil Nadu and other states are adding to the efforts with separate targets and schemes.

PV IndiaTech Talk: Finlay Colville to deliver 1-hour manufacturing seminar

PV Tech can reveal that our head of research, Dr. Finlay Colville, will deliver a one-hour presentation seminar during the forthcoming PV IndiaTech 2019 conference taking place in Delhi on 24-25 April 2019.

The talk – titled Global manufacturing trends, benchmarking: how India competes as a production powerhouse in the PV industry from 2020 onwards – will provide the Indian PV sector with key metrics needed to evaluate the viability of upstream investments demanded under the country’s emerging domestic-content requirement policies.

Ahead of Finlay’s talk – scheduled to close the final day of PV IndiaTech 2019 on 25 April 2019 – PV Tech took the opportunity to chat with Finlay about what to expect from his seminar, and the drivers behind the content and value of such a presentation at the event.

Mark Osborne: Thanks Finlay for taking the time to preview the PV IndiaTech 2019 event, the full details of which were recently covered in a blog on PV-Tech earlier this week. Can you start by explaining what prompted you to undertake a one-hour seminar assignment as part of the agenda over the two days of the event?

Dr. Finlay Colville: Most times at events, my inputs are limited in scope and often confined to specific global PV issues within a 20-30 minute presentation slot. However, this time, a longer and more detailed talk was deemed to be of value due to unique circumstances impacting the whole India PV value-chain today.

During the research our team has undertaken over the past six months, through hundreds of discussions with the entire Indian PV sector – from government bodies, policy-makers, investors, manufacturers, suppliers, site builders and asset owners – it became clear that everyone in India has a fundamental need to understand global technology trends and how changes under the broad Make-in-India initiative will impact component production and site supply during the decade from 2020 to 2030. By 2030, India is likely to have surpassed its long-term aspiration to have more than 300GW of PV deployed and a significant portion of this will involve cells, modules, materials and BoS components that are produced by Indian companies or JV’s involving partnering overseas entities.

Virtually everyone we spoke to asked us what the real technology roadmap of the PV industry would be, which companies were driving the benchmarks for product performance, cost and pricing, and critically what India should invest in to be competitive with product coming out of China.

It therefore seemed important that a one-hour seminar could be of great value at the event, with our research and methodology adopted within the PV-Tech market research team offering an unbiased bottom-up perspective.

Is it simply a case of India adding more cell lines that are based on p-mono PERC, or is it more complicated than this?

In short, it is much more complicated, and way more far-reaching than simply adding a few gigawatts of mono PERC that is now a 50GW+ manufacturing industry installed within China, and where some leading cell makers are intent on adding tens of GW’s of new capacity in the next few years.

The decision-making within India today includes more basic questions such as:

Should the investments covered under DCR policies be confined to cells and modules, or is there a viable roadmap where poly/wafer capacity can have any viability and global significance?
If wafer production is chosen, how does the country possibly compete with leaders such as GCL-Poly and LONGi Solar?
What role does thin-film play, given this is a technology that has seen huge investments in recent years from the industry’s leader First Solar – a company that has huge experience of setting up GW-level fabs globally with efficiency of build and ramp-up.
Should investments be based on having a large number of 500MW to 1GW factories, or is there a need to back a small group of technologies/companies and drive economy-of-scale benefits in 5-10GW operations?
How do the investments translate to having materials supply for cell/module assembly covered under Make-in-India mandates, and what needs to be ringfenced also at the balance-of-systems level?

The key thing India has in its favour here is based on the 300GW by 2030 target, and probably being the lowest-risk 100GW-plus deployment country in the world during the decade from 2020 to 2030. This simple fact means that every major company making, using and owning solar products and assets either has, or will have soon, an India-specific business plan to cover the next 10 years.
Therefore, India does have an incredibly powerful hand to play in setting out the ground rules for what this 300GW will look like, and crucially how it must come to fruition alongside a viable and profitable manufacturing sector.

So while, every solar company globally should be aware of technology trends and price/cost forecasting, India has to quickly be up-to-speed across every segment of its industry, from government advisers thought to IPPs and long-term portfolio owners.
 

There have been many announcement though in the past ten years of JV’s, MoU’s and initiatives, almost all of which have come to nothing. So what is different now?

Yes, there was a time when the announcements were barely worth reading, but in the past 12 months, lots of things have happened that have changed the landscape and relevance of the country for inward investment and domestic-owned capacity expansions.

First, the country now has 25GW-plus of deployed solar capacity, and the stats in terms of cell and module supply do not make happy-reading for many within India, as more than 90% has been imported from China. And a large portion of this has been product that is lower-performing than cells and modules used in other global regions.

Attempts to have anti-dumping and other import tariff based additives placed on overseas origin-of-manufacture have not had any meaningful impact, very similar to every other case of AD-related actions taken within the solar industry.

Crucially, the WTO-compliant DCR carve-out allocations now dominate policy-makers intentions and this changes everything for domestic production within India.

Different today also is that the PV industry has gone through a rapid evolution of high-efficiency and yield-enhancing product availability for utility-scale solar farm deployment. We are now at a time in the growth of PV where simply being the lowest-cost producer of p-multi mono-facial Al-BSF product wins out. And this is driving productivity gains at a rapid rate, and now there is scope for technology differentiation and ASP premiums that are clear winners when forecasting site returns and IRRs to the finance community. Technical due-diligence within the banks is real, and works!

Returning to your one-hour seminar at the event, can you give some teasers as to what you will be covering?

Anyone that has tuned into my online webinars during the past few years will be aware roughly of the topics covered when looking at manufacturing value-chain metrics, and the seminar at PV IndiaTech will broadly follow these guidelines, but focused on “what does this mean for new capacity within India, and how can it compete and be of value to developers and EPCs in the next few years”.

The seminar will start by looking at the likely technology split for module supply globally over the next five years, including some of the factors that drive inflection points in technology availability. This will be followed by going through the c-Si value-chain, from poly to module, explaining the cost benchmarks for both p-multi and p-mono and how this sustains further ASP erosion going forward.

In particular, the talk will focus on the companies that are the drivers behind low-cost manufacturing, for polysilicon, wafers, cells and modules. This is essential today, as this sets the low-cost threshold that everyone is judged against and is the difference between margins being positive or in the red.

The tricky bit comes next and is the question that the entire Make-in-India solar proposition is founded on: how can India prosper when investing in new manufacturing capacity going forward, and how can it compete with China. One can almost forget other countries outside India in terms of benchmarking: everything is about China as the benchmark.

So, one final question. Do you think there will be one clear call-to-action or will the debate rumble on for years to come, in terms of how India adds new capacity and is competitive on the global stage?

The good thing is there is no single route to be competitive going forward, but several. Everything does come back to investor returns and not module ASP or site-build capex. It seems simple and obvious to say, but all too often when solar farms builds kick off in countries, this is not fully implemented.

When you look globally at how utility-scale market evolve, there is a transition point from EPC driven site capex to investor-driven site returns. India would appear to be pending this key inflection point, but the more that completed site builds come under the spotlight in terms of performance ratio reviews, the more likely investors are to have an influence on capex, supplier choice and – importantly – technology selection.

Therefore, whether the offer is p-multi, p-mono PERC or n-type, there are attractive IRRs on offer going forward in the next few years, but in each case, product quality and supplier selection are paramount, and the role of third-party testing labs, factory auditors and independent engineers.

This means there is no binary selection process in terms of technology for new capacity, but more the requirement to focus on being aligned with benchmarks whether n/p type or mono/multi based, or in that matter mono-facial/bifacial, and so on for fixed-axis or tracking.

A few years ago, project development and module selection was weighted largely to p-multi (60 or 72-cell), but globally this has moved dramatically in the past few years. India will make this move in the next 12-18 months, at exactly the point where new manufacturing capacity comes online. As such, it would appear prudent to have knowledge on which technologies will be part of industry supply for utility-use in the next few years, and how each can offer returns to investors, with reliable and predicable yields.

 

The PV IndiaTech 2019 event takes place in Delhi on 24-25 April 2019. Details on how to attend can be found through the event website here.

CSUN India dispute a ‘one-off case’, says ACME Solar

India’s Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) has warned domestic companies against using solar modules from Chinese supplier CSUN, having received complaints from several Indian firms.

One of India’s leading developers, ACME Solar, which has 2.5GW of solar capacity in operation and 4GW at various stages of development, was one of the complainants.

Sandeep Kashyap, president of ACME, told PV Tech: “We have dealt with most of the Tier 1/Major module suppliers from China and find this to be a special one-off case so far. Having said that, we also understand CSUN, with 1.2GW of integrated facilities, has defaulted with multiple developers in India in the last two years.”

Indeed, the Consulate General of India in Shanghai has also reported that CSUN is a “high risk” company with more than 160 court cases filed against it in Chinese courts in the last five years, mainly for similar breaches of contract, showing the firm to be what Kashyap described as “a habitual offender”.

An MNRE notice said that CSUN had breached module supply contracts with Indian firms and failed to return advance payments made to them. The Ministry noted one specific case where the matter had been settled in favour of an Indian company through the Singapore International Arbitration Centre (see boxed text below), but CSUN has not yet honoured the ruling.

In the light of its approaching solar target of 100GW by 2022, MNRE stated: “Such breach of valid contracts and not supplying modules on time by foreign companies cannot be tolerated.”

Tier trouble

Kashyap noted that CSUN had been a member of Bloomberg’s Tier-1 list of module suppliers at the time of the procurement, a list which is referred to by many global buyers and financial institutions, however, since then, CSUN has been taken off the list.

The BNEF solar tiering team told PV Tech that it was fully aware of CSUN’s financial situation and highlighted that the first paragraph of its tiering list methodology, which has been online in more or less the same form since 2012, states this “should never replace a proper due diligence process in product selection”.

Kashyap said MNRE has been trying to ensure supply from reputed and serious module manufacturers in India through new quality standards and introducing its ‘Approved List of Models and Manufacturers (ALMM)’, in which it will be compulsory for all module suppliers in or into India to enlist after March 2020. For the ALMM, inspection teams will ascertain, as far as possible, that there are no contractual violations on part of the applicant in supply of cells or modules.

Kashyap added that ACME was grateful to MNRE for responding to the complaints and safeguarding the industry from contractors that don’t fulfil their commitments.

Escalation risk

Adding an alternative viewpoint, Vinay Rustagi, managing director of consultancy firm Bridge to India, said: “Unfortunately, this has been the nature of market - the breaches have been going on for a long time on both sides.

“The government action, while laudable, creates the risk of escalation when trade anxieties are already very high. We believe that such matters should ideally be resolved by private companies themselves or by industry associations.”

MNRE said Indian companies would now be dealing with CSUN at their own risk and advised companies to contact Indian authorities in China to verify the reputation of Chinese companies before placing any orders. It is also informing banks and lending institutions on the matter.

The ACME Case

According to ACME Solar, it placed an order with CSUN for the supply of 30MW of solar PV modules on 20 September 2017. It paid a 30% advance on 25 September 2017, but CSUN failed to supply 30MW modules to ACME. The two parties then mutually agreed to reduce the capacity to 9MW – equivalent to the advance amount paid to CSUN – however, CSUN again failed to supply 9MW modules and did not return the advance amount paid by ACME.

ACME stated: “This has happened for the first time [during the] last nine years of module purchasing from China. CSUN is the only one amongst most suppliers which defaulted on meeting their contractual obligations.”

In March 2018, ACME applied under Rule 5.1 of the SIAC (Singapore International Arbitration Centre) for the arbitration to be conducted. CSUN did not appear in any of the arbitration hearings.

On 24 January 2019, Arbitral Tribunal ordered CSUN to pay the claimant more than US$4 million for damages for breach of contract with additional legal and arbitration costs.

PV Tech has contacted CSUN for comment but the Chinese firm has yet to reply.

SECI tenders 2GW of local content solar under CPSU scheme

Solar Energy Corporation of India (SECI) has issued a tender for 2GW of solar to be procured by Central Public Sector Undertakings (CPSUs), as per its announcement at the beginning of this month.

This is part of the CPSU Scheme Phase II, which mandates cells and modules to be sourced locally, and projects will be developed on a build, own operate (BOO) basis.

The minimum capacity for bidding is 10MW with a maximum of 2GW. The deadline for bid submissions is 3 May 2019.

Projects have an 18-month commissioning timeframe, but a six-month extension is possible.

On 5 March, the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) issued the CPSU Scheme Phase-II for setting up 12GW of grid-connected PV projects by government producers with Viability Gap Funding (VGF) support. Power generated must be for the self-consumption of government entities either directly or through distribution companies (Discoms).

In the case of this 2GW tender, usages charges should not be more than INR3.50/kWh (US$0.051).

The total 12GW capacity will be added over a four-year period from FY 2019-20 to 2022-23. 

Back in February, SECI also announced plans for a 1GW CPSU solar tender

The latest issuance comes amid an unprecedented tendering spree across India.

The inaugural PV IndiaTech conference kicks off in New Delhi on 24-25 April.

India approves National Mission on Transformative Mobility and Battery Storage

India’s Union Cabinet chaired by prime minister Narendra Modi has approved the ‘National Mission on Transformative Mobility and Battery Storage’, with a focus on local manufacturing across the whole supply chain for electric vehicles (EV) including battery and cell manufacturing.

The mission includes a five-year phased manufacturing program to set up “a few large-scale, export-competitive integrated batteries and cell-manufacturing Giga plants in India”. This also includes such a program to localise production across the entire EV value chain.

A phased roadmap to implement battery manufacturing at Giga-scale will be considered with an initial focus on large-scale module and pack assembly plants by 2019-20, followed by integrated cell manufacturing by 2021-22.

Energy storage analysts and industry members have consistently said over recent years that any major push in EVs across India will naturally help to spur the stationary storage industry given the synchronicities across lithium-ion batteries at present and the likely reduction in battery costs for both sectors as a result. Thus, the stated focus on electric mobility of the Mission should not be of concern to the stationary storage lobby.

Indeed, the approval notice also stated: “These solutions will help improve air quality in cities along with reducing India’s oil import dependence and enhance the uptake of renewable energy and storage solutions.”

However, Energy-Storage.news has previously highlighted how India’s draft National Energy Storage Mission had focused almost exclusively on manufacturing and reducing costs of domestic EV batteries, with little mention of stationary storage.

Nonetheless, the new National Mission on Transformative Mobility and Battery Storage approval comes simultaneously to India’s second attempt at kicking off its large-scale solar-plus-storage ambitions. Solar Energy Corporation of India (SECI) has now released two major tenders including 1.2GW of solar PV combined with 3,600MWh of energy storage connected to the national grid, as well as a smaller tender for 200MW solar with 300MWh of storage in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh.

Significant market potential

Debi Prasad Dash, executive director of India Energy Storage Alliance (IESA), said: “We welcome the cabinet’s decision on setting up of National Mission on Transformative Mobility and Battery Storage. […] This announcement is the result of the work done over the past 6 years by India Energy Storage Alliance (IESA) along with various state agencies, as well as central government departments including MNRE, MOP, and NITI Aayog on different aspects related to energy storage policy. The mission also suggested to have the steering committee with representation of 8 ministries & departments, which will definitely bring appropriate co-ordination on appropriate policy creation.

“India has a significant market potential for batteries and electric vehicles. Electric vehicles are creating a big demand and due to this demand, the cost of batteries will further come down.  IESA estimates the market for energy storage would grow to over 300GWh during 2018-25. IESA is working with various EV & charging infrastructure companies through its MOVE (Moving Onwards with Vehicle electrification) initiative to catalyze the adoption through indigenous manufacturing of EV components. Currently, more than 10 companies are doing module and Li-Ion pack assembling in India and we’re expecting 4-5 large companies to enter cell manufacturing in the next 2-3 years. With appropriate policy support through this mission, Indian companies will be able to diversify into energy storage business. Through Make In India initiative, India will able to compete with the countries like China, Australia, Germany, USA, Taiwan, South Korea other Li-Ion manufacturing countries.”

India’s latest ‘big step’: 200MW / 300MWh of solar-plus-storage up for tender

India has released another significant solar-plus-storage tender – this time in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh.

Solar Energy Corporation of India (SECI) invited bids for 200MW of grid-connected solar projects to be combined with 300MWh of battery energy storage.

This will include two separate 100MW PV projects, each with 150MWh of batteries at the Galiveedu Site of Ananthapuramu Ultra Mega Solar Park, and at the Talaricheruvu Solar Park.

The latest news confirms India’s reignition of its large-scale solar and storage plans. Last week, after SECI announced a tender for 1.2GW of ISTS-connected solar to be combined with 3,600MWh of energy storage, Dr Rahul Walawalkar, president, India Energy Storage Alliance (IESA) and CES (India), told our sister site PV Tech: “This is the big and long-awaited step and we can see that in the last four months the government’s seriousness towards the sector after some unfortunate cancellations of tenders for over 100MWh in 2017-18. IESA had strongly protested the cancellations and delays in implementation of the storage projects, and we are hopeful that this time, the government will prioritize these projects and see them through to implementation.”

Although the latest tender is far smaller than last week’s, it is still pioneering as one of the first such large-scale solar and storage tenders in India. Similar attempts in Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka were cancelled in 2017, as mentioned by Walawalkar.

SECI has also invited bids for 1.2GW of Interstate Transmission System (ISTS)-connected solar projects in the central state of Madhya Pradesh, and 275MW of grid-connected PV projects in a solar park in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh.

All the detailed Request for Selection Documents (RfS) for the three tenders shall be available by 30 March.

Indian solar tendering rolls on with another major co-located storage issuance

India has continued to fling out solar tenders with 1.2GW in Madhya Pradesh, 275MW in Uttar Pradesh, and a significant solar-plus-storage tender in Andhra Pradesh.

Solar Energy Corporation of India (SECI) invited bids for 1.2GW of Interstate Transmission System (ISTS)-connected solar projects in the central state of Madhya Pradesh, a state with excellent solar resources, but with less power demand than other parts of India hence the national grid connection.

SECI also released a notice of interest (NIT) for setting up 275MW of grid-connected PV projects in a solar park in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh.

The Agency also announced an NIT for 200MW of grid-connected solar projects to be combined with 300MWh of battery energy storage in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh.

This will include two 100MW PV projects, each with 150MWh of batteries at the Galiveedu Site of Ananthapuramu Ultra Mega Solar Park and at the Talaricheruvu Solar Park.

All the detailed Request for Selection Documents (RfS) for the three tenders shall be available by 30 March.

The latest news confirms India’s reignition of its large-scale solar and storage plans. Last week, after SECI announced a tender for 1.2GW of ISTS-connected solar to be combined with 3,600MWh of energy storage, Dr Rahul Walawalkar, president, India Energy Storage Alliance (IESA) and CES (India), told PV Tech: “This is the big and long-awaited step and we can see that in the last four months the government’s seriousness towards the sector after some unfortunate cancellations of tenders for over 100MWh in 2017-18. IESA had strongly protested the cancellations and delays in implementation of the storage projects, and we are hopeful that this time, the government will prioritize these projects and see them through to implementation.”

Most recently, SECI said that another 2GW tender for solar to be procured by Central Public Sector Undertakings (CPSUs) would be made available this month, amid an unprecedented tendering spree that seems to keep on rolling this month ahead of the general election.

Cabinet approves National Mission on Transformative Mobility and Battery Storage

In related news, the Union Cabinet chaired by Prime Minister Narendra Modi has approved:

  1. Setting up of a ‘National Mission on Transformative Mobility and Battery Storage’, to drive clean, connected, shared, sustainable and holistic mobility initiatives;
  2. Phased Manufacturing Programme (PMP) valid for 5 years to support setting up of a few large-scale, export-competitive integrated batteries and cell-manufacturing Giga plants in India.
  3. Creation of a PMP valid for 5 years to localize production across the entire Electric Vehicles value chain.

Both PMP schemes will be finalised by the National Mission on Transformative Mobility and Battery Storage.

A phased roadmap to implement battery manufacturing at Giga-scale will be considered with an initial focus on large-scale module and pack assembly plants by 2019-20, followed by integrated cell manufacturing by 2021-22.

Debi Prasad Dash, executive director of India Energy Storage Alliance (IESA), said: “We welcome the cabinet’s decision on setting up of National Mission on Transformative Mobility and Battery Storage. […] This announcement is the result of the work done over the past 6 years by India Energy Storage Alliance (IESA) along with various state agencies, as well as central government departments including MNRE, MOP, and NITI Aayog on different aspects related to energy storage policy. The mission also suggested to have the steering committee with representation of 8 ministries & departments, which will definitely bring appropriate co-ordination on appropriate policy creation.

“India has a significant market potential for batteries and electric vehicles. Electric vehicles are creating a big demand and due to this demand, the cost of batteries will further come down.  IESA estimates the market for energy storage would grow to over 300 GWh during 2018-25. IESA is working with various EV & charging infrastructure companies through its MOVE (Moving Onwards with Vehicle electrification) initiative to catalyze the adoption through indigenous manufacturing of EV components. Currently, more than 10 companies are doing module and Li-Ion pack assembling in India and we’re expecting 4-5 large companies to enter cell manufacturing in the next 2-3 years. With appropriate policy support through this mission, Indian companies will be able to diversify into energy storage business. Through Make In India initiative, India will able to compete with the countries like China, Australia, Germany, USA, Taiwan, South Korea other Li-Ion manufacturing countries.”

SECI readies 2GW local content solar tender for public sector

Solar Energy Corporation of India (SECI) has said that another 2GW tender for solar to be procured by Central Public Sector Undertakings (CPSUs) will be made available this month.

The CPSU scheme mandates cells and modules to be sourced locally and as per a note released today by the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE), the government will be keeping a close eye on early tenders with a view to possibly including ingots, wafers and polysilicon to the domestic content mandate in future CPSU tenders.

The 2GW tender, supported by Viability Gap Funding (VGF), will be released on 25 March.

Back in February, SECI also announced plans for a 1GW CPSU solar tender

The latest issuance comes amid an unprecedented tendering spree across India.

The inaugural PV IndiaTech conference kicks off in New Delhi on 24-25 April.

India solar tender spree continues north and south

Continuing a gargantuan tender spree, Solar Energy Corporation of India (SECI) has issued a notice of interest for 500MW of PV projects in Tamil Nadu, 750MW in Rajasthan, and several solar-plus-storage offerings in Jammu & Kashmir.

The issuances come alongside 400MW of floating PV tenders in Tamil Nadu (250MW) and Jharkhand (150MW). 

SECI invited bids for 500MW of grid-connected standalone solar PV capacity in the southern state of Tamil Nadu. A Request for Selection (RfS) document will be available from 15 March.

Meanwhile, the RfS for 750MW of standalone projects in the northern state of Rajasthan will go up on 19 March. A PV auction recently completed in Rajasthan attracted lowest bids of 2.48 rupees per unit.

SECI is also hoping to procure 2MW of solar PV across two army posts at Siachen and Parapur in Jammu & Kashmir at the far north of the country. The RfS will come online from 11 March.

Finally, bids have been invited for two solar-plus-storage projects in the Leh and Kargil regions of Ladakh, which is also part of Jammu & Kashmir state. Each project will have 7MW of solar PV combined with 21MWh of battery energy storage systems. Full details will be released on 15 March.

Last week, SECI also announced plans for huge tenders across the country with various combinations of solar, energy storage, wind and hybrid concepts, followed by a 1GW in the northeastern states.

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